NP3 outcomes related to RQ5

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RQ5 - How does the research inform how to represent and model a participative pedagogy of mutuality (Bruner, 1996; Wenger, 1998; Alexander, 2000; Murphy & Wolfenden, 2013) and engage teachers with that pedagogy?

RQ5 was concerned with the extent to which teachers’ pedagogic practices aligned with a sociocultural model.

The Innovative Pedagogy Framework (IPF) was developed as a tool to analyse the teachers’ pedagogic practices. The IPF defines five theoretically informed models of pedagogy in terms of their key features. The following pairs of schools/teachers were analysed using the IPF and compared. In each case the two members of a pair had very different quantities of ICT use (as defined by the ICT Innovation Framework (ICTIF)):

  • Fairfield Lower (Quantity >40%) with Byrne Primary (Quantity <10%)
  • Ms Harrison (Quantity <50%) with Ms Allen (Quantity <10%), both in Stepside Primary
  • Mr Ryan (Quantity <40%) with Ms Peak (Quantity <20%), both in Riverview Prep

This analysis suggested that:

  • the Innovative Pedagogy Framework (IPF) is a useful tool for comparing pedagogy across classes/schools
  • the data suggested a relationship between a school’s over-arching pedagogical model and the Quantity and Mode of ICT use (as defined by the ICTIF) – specifically, a Traditional model having less ICT use and that use having less impact on what and/or how children are taught than a Constructivist or Innovative pedagogical model
  • whilst the school arena is important, an individual teacher’s identities and pedagogical stance may be more important:
    • a Constructivist or Innovative pedagogical stance being more likely to be associated with a higher quantity of ICT use and greater impact of that use on what and/or how the children are taught
    • irrespective of their pedagogical stance, teachers who position themselves as ICT users and see ICT as being an important part of their identity are more likely to make more use of ICT in their teaching, which may also involve using it in ways that change what and/or how the children are taught.

These findings are tentative and need further investigation.

See Section 11 of the meta-analysis report for full details of these findings.

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